All posts by Elizabeth Doyle

Building Capacity in Rural Care: A Critical Need for People with Dementia

“Despite having a higher proportion of adults over age 65 than cities, rural areas have fewer primary health care, specialist and support services available.” Dr. Debra Morgan There’s a critical need for better primary health care (PHC) in rural areas for people with dementia. Despite having a higher proportion of adults over the age of 65, rural areas have fewer PHC, specialist, and support services available than cities do, according to Dr. Debra Morgan. This leaves some people in rural communities living with undiagnosed dementia, and without an effective care plan to manage their disease as it progresses. Striving to reverse Read the full article…

Team 20 on How Indigenous Culture and Community Affect Experiences of Dementia

“Our research is part of a larger movement toward ensuring that Indigenous people have access to appropriate care from health professionals who understand their history and enough about their culture that they can adapt their approaches and programming to make it more comfortable, and to make it feel more safe for them.” Dr. Kristen Jacklin Dr. Kristen Jacklin’s research shows that rates of dementia in First Nations and Aboriginal communities in Canada have been steadily increasing for the past 7-10 years. What’s more, onset is now occurring, on average, 10 years younger than in non-Indigenous communities. Already a clear departure Read the full article…

CCNA Researcher, Dr. Sandra Black, Appointed to the Order of Canada

“Clinicians and researchers need to work together to better understand the interactions between stroke, vascular disease, and Alzheimer’s disease in order to tackle neurodegeneration. You can’t focus on one disease and think that you’re going to fix the whole problem.” Dr. Sandra Black   Neurodegeneration is a kind of battle between two processes: one that slowly destroys brain cells and another that tries to repair the damage and keep going. According to Dr. Sandra Black, “under attack are not only nerve cells but also glial and vascular endothelium, a close family of cells called the ‘neurovascular unit.’ Eventually, the capacity Read the full article…

Melissa Andrew Helps Reveal the True Face of Dementia

Two people with similar brain changes that may give rise to dementia can have very different disease manifestations… we think that a holistic understanding of overall health and social environments will contribute to solving this puzzle. Dr. Melissa Andrew   There is a pattern that is “unmistakeable” in the clinic, and yet unexamined in studies and trials. According to Dr. Melissa Andrew, individuals who have many medical, functional, and social problems are at an increased risk of developing dementia, and also tend to have a more severe disease course.   Advancing research in this area is complicated by the fact that Read the full article…

A National Dementia Strategy would enable more Personalized Care

“My hope is that – as chairman of the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues program of the CCNA – I can facilitate the interaction between the CCNA and the future federal government to develop a national plan against dementia.”  Dr. Serge Gauthier   It’s not just about funding. Providing better diagnostic services and supports for dementia care throughout Canada requires allocating funds more strategically, according to Dr. Serge Gauthier. And this is what his vision of a national plan could help to facilitate.   Developing and mobilizing this plan is the job not of politicians, but of citizens, Gauthier explains. Read the full article…

Can Resistance to Alzheimer’s disease be Built?

“Hopefully – through the ‘intelligent’ leisure activities we develop – we can help individuals to build the kind of cognitive reserve that we know is protective against Alzheimer’s disease.” – Dr. Sylvie Belleville   Despite having no symptoms prior to death, some people end up dying with brains riddled with Alzheimer’s pathology. How do we explain this?   According to Dr. Sylvie Belleville, engaging in stimulating activities over the course of a lifetime is what seems to make the difference.   An indirect benefit of activities, she explains, is that they help to build up cognitive resilience over time, and Read the full article…

Discovery: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer’s disease, licensed by Emergent BioSolutions

“This discovery… speaks to the possibility that we could develop a human vaccine that would prevent Alzheimer’s disease. You know, get your immunization at 50, and perhaps prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s. It’s a very exciting prospect now.”  – Dr. Neil Cashman   Next week, international investigators, health care professionals, and industry organizations will come together to share the latest breakthroughs and theories in dementia research at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Washington, D.C. The timing and forum could not be better for Dr. Neil Cashman and his team to announce their recent discovery, which has implications Read the full article…

“Failure is just not an option. We have to keep going at it until we get it right,” –Dr. Sultan Darvesh

It began with the unwavering belief that discovering a cure for Alzheimer’s disease requires looking at our brains to understand what is happening within them. Now, over 900 brain tissue samples later, Dr. Sultan Darvesh and his team at the Maritime Brain Tissue Bank (MBTB) are confident that they have found the target that could enable the definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. The Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA) is accelerating these efforts by providing the infrastructure and support to enable collaboration amongst Canada’s top dementia researchers.   Having developed a radioactive molecule that binds with butyrylcholinesterase – i.e. Read the full article…