All posts by Joe Lindsay

CCNA Team 14: How Multi-Morbidity Modifies the Risk of Dementia and the Patterns of Disease expression

“Team 14 is really about understanding how having health conditions all adding up together impacts the risk of getting dementia, how dementia progresses, and also how we manage and treat dementia. Our team aims to address the “real world of dementia,” which is that most people tend to have other chronic health conditions rather than being otherwise healthy. Also, more women than men tend to be affected by dementia. We want to understand why this is. Additionally, social environments are very important in being risk factors for dementia as well as impacting how people deal with the disease and how it’s managed.”

CCNA Team 10: Cognitive Intervention, Cognitive Reserve, and Brain Plasticity

“Our hypothesis is that it’s not too late to build an increased reserve even later in life…. We think that by combining laboratory-based techniques and more natural leisure activities, we will obtain a program that is not only scientifically strong, but also fun and engaging. It will also suit people’s needs and interests and therefore provide more direct benefit to their everyday life.”

CCNA Knowledge Translation and Exchange Cross-Cutting Program

“Our objective is to have sex and gender included in all of CCNA’s programs, teams and platforms. … Taken together [our initiatives] will enable hypotheses to be generated and tested in the CCNA, which – ideally – will lead to a better understanding of the causes of neurodegeneration, and to the development of interventions and treatments uniquely tailored to differences between men and women.”

CCNA Women, Gender, Sex and Dementia Cross-Cutting Program (Webinar Style)

“Our objective is to have sex and gender included in all of CCNA’s programs, teams and platforms. … Taken together [our initiatives] will enable hypotheses to be generated and tested in the CCNA, which – ideally – will lead to a better understanding of the causes of neurodegeneration, and to the development of interventions and treatments uniquely tailored to differences between men and women.”

CCNA Team 11: The Prevention and Treatment of Behavioral Symptoms of Dementia in Long-Term Care (Webinar Style)

“Team 11 is focusing on the prevention and treatment of behavioural symptoms associated with people in long term care residents who have dementia. [These] behavioural symptoms affect nearly 80% of all long term care residents and are associated with poorer prognosis, increased medication use, and greater health care utilization and cost. Currently, there are limited effective and safe interventions to prevent and treat the behavioural symptoms. [Our] team aims to recognize the impact of challenging behaviours associated with dementia, and to identify interventions we can develop to assist in preventing and treating these symptoms.”

CCNA Team 18: Clinical Intervention for Family Caregivers who are Employed in the Canadian Workforce (Webinar Style)

“We’re investigating key factors that affect the practical, psychological and social lives of Canadian family members who are employed, while also providing care giving to a senior with dementia at home. Our goal is to understand the challenges of this dual role, and respond to those challenges through validated interventions that provide the specific skills and the emotional resources family members need to balance their competing concerns.”

CCNA Team 6: Nutrition, Exercise, and Lifestyle (Webinar Style)

“Recent studies have provided very strong support to the effect that disorders, such as heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure negatively affect brain health. Sedentary lifestyle and poor diet – clearly – increase our risk for dementia. And, interestingly, the combination of both sedentary lifestyle and poor diet is worse than either alone. … Up to half the cases of Alzheimer’s disease may be the result of diet and lifestyle-associated disorders. We have a real opportunity here to lower the burden of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, in the Canadian population.”

CCNA Team 4: Early Synaptic Changes and Metabolomics

“We’re looking at early synaptic changes in the brain in Alzheimer’s disease. These changes may lead to the discovery of new targets for treatment and new biomarkers for early diagnosis. We’re developing novel models to study the disease, new ways of imaging those models, and looking at the effects of inflammation, amyloid accumulation, and altered metabolism on neuronal cell death.”

CCNA Team 17: Interventions at the Sensory-Cognitive Interface

“This year we have worked very hard to ensure that sophisticated measures of hearing, vision, and cognition are included in the CCNA database. One project that we have underway in the first year of the CCNA is looking at the experience of the older adult who has dementia and who is hospitalized. [We are] capitalizing on the data available in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging… The factors that we are studying are going to be important for the other teams in the CCNA. There are teams that are looking at cognitive training, driving, mobility, care in long term facilities, and patients who primarily have a psychiatric presentation to their illness.”